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20121112
20121120
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as advances in military and defense technology. from last week, this runs just over an hour. >> ladies and gentlemen, welcome. my name is gideon and i'm the editor of foreign affairs and it is a wonderful privilege and honor and pleasure to be here again at the halifax from. foreign affairs is in the business of serious discussions by knowledgeable people with important issues, free and frank exchanges on the most important questions out there and that's actually the same business that halifax is and so we are delighted to be the media sponsor, and it is going to be fantastic weekend. let me just cut right to the chase. we have a fantastic panel, and more importantly, a great topic and a wonderful group with all of you as well and so let's get right to it. our panelists here, david singer of "the new york times," the former undersecretary deputy secretary of state for global affairs now a fellow at the center at harvard. the head of telefax holders distinguished sibling, the munich security conference where they have a great group. the point of the session is to do some big thinking on
imaginable. i was a dream child. today with the marvels of technology designed by america, they get to watch these. they taught me to dream. they taught me to never give up. my father instilled in me to never have any master. my mother instilled in me the need to care and protect those weaker than i care they taught me the virtue of confidence, even at the expense of the perception of arrogance. the top intimate the most of every second of life and i'm proud to say that it does not as much as humanly possible. i live in australia and traveled to america frequently. if i could move here tomorrow, i would. it may sound strange, but i have often felt that if i were an american trapped in an australian body. [laughter] such as my empathy and depreciation of american culture and a culture of optimism, support. don't get me wrong. i love my country and i'm prepared to pay the ultimate sacrifice for it. i owe almost all that i am to australia. it is a magnificent country and perhaps the greatest for those that wish to read lives in color between the length of the appetite for risk or attempting the
of the institute for science, law and technology at the illinois institute of technology and she has also served to the u.s. government on ethical issues, regarding new technologies. our second father is hannah rosin. she has written a book called "the end of men and the rise of women." she documents the levels of men and women in every society and the implications for marriage, sex, children, work, and a whole lot more. using research and original reporting, she finds women and men from every stratum of class, education and culture, behaving in ways that point to an upended social order. she is also a senior editor at the atlantic and a founder of the women's section. last but not least, jow walsh in "what is the matter with white people." she argues that the fundamental divide is not about party or ideology, or even about race. but about how each side believes that we got here. too many americans today think that they got where they are without any help. this fundamental misunderstanding is at the heart of why so many white class voters have issues. please help me welcome these three fantastic
technology? [laughter] >> let's take three more questions. the three people who are in line. >> mr. wolfe, um, i'm a native miamian, and thanks to you about 20 years ago there were three gentlemen running across i-95, um, asking if they could help my husband and i. and i knew what was going down having read "bonfire of the vanities." they weren't coming to help me at all. [laughter] and we were robbed at gunpoint. but i've since lived here for a long time and raised three children, and it's a wonderful city. i love miami, and i just wondered after you having done your research and meeting all these interesting characters that we clearly have no shortage of here, if it's the kind of place that you think you could live. >> well, i think there's no blanket statement that i think i could make because there's such variety in miami. i don't know these statistics for single mothers and things like that, you probably do, but it's, it's such a complicated, it's really such a complicated subject. but it wouldn't hurt people to cut down a little bit, seems to me. >> do you think you could live here? do
a company called cultivated risk. we do projects that combined humor and technology to sell better stories, make the world less horrible. so day job permanent job, and between sleep job. it's all i think about. i want to be one of those makers, not one of the stickers >> how has having a black president affected your work? >> well, it gives me one other job that is accessible now, which is great. you can add that to the list of the ag and athletes and sassy black woman, also president. that is pretty cool. expanded the range. it is a fun and proud image. it also created some challenges. president obama as a symbol of massive racial progress is often overstated. so it makes the argument more complicated. our work here is finished as america in the great racial project of equal opportunity. it really isn't, and so having a black president is a shortcut to avoid the difficult conversations and work that we still have to do as a nation. great progress has been achieved, but there is still so much more to go. obama is at challenging figure. he makes us to more than we really have. >> how to be
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5